Did You Know This Secret Ingredient In Your Dog’s Favorite Treat Might KILL Them

Some folks give their pups biscuits from a box; others prefer a rawhide bone that will entertain their pooch for hours; and then there are those who like to treat their dogs to something similar to what we humans eat, like chicken, salmon, cheese, or apple slices. These foods have always been doggy-friendly and keep our best friends healthy and happy.

But what if we told you that there is one pup-approved snack we’ve always been told is okay for a dog to eat but now, thanks to a new ingredient, can actually be as deadly to a dog as chocolate? Believe it or not, it’s true, and if you see your dog acting strangely, it may be a result of this.

According to a finding by the ASPCA, there is a new ingredient in a popular food item that most Americans have it in our refrigerators or pantries at this very moment that if ingested by a dog can kill them. In fact, I just ate it this morning. You may want to think twice about feeding it to my dog?

The new ingredient is called “xylitol,” a substitute sweetener that is naturally sourced, safe for diabetics, and has great dental benefits for humans.

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It sounds great for people, but it’s deadly if consumed by a pup.

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It is now being used in peanut butter. A favorite of many dogs.

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According to the ASPCA, it is also used in sugar-free gum and mints, nicotine gum, chewable vitamins, oral-care products, and baked goods. “It can be purchased in a granulated form for baking and as a sweetener for cereals and beverages.” So it’s imperative that you check these items and keep them away from your pet if you have them at home.

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To dogs, xylitol is extremely dangerous. Tiny amounts of the sweetener can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugar and can lead to liver failure. This chart shows how a tiny amount can affect different dogs.To dogs, xylitol is extremely dangerous. Tiny amounts of the sweetener can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugar and can lead to liver failure. This chart shows how a tiny amount can affect different dogs

 It is also important to note that if you see your dog doing this, called “head pressing,” it may be a sign that they have ingested xylitol. Head pressing is a symptom of toxic poisoning, infection of the nervous system, a tumor, or head trauma.
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Peanut butter brands it can be found in are Nuts ’N More® and Krush Nutrition, so it is important that you always read labels. Of course, many brands you’d find in the supermarket aisle are perfectly fine.

Peanut butter brands it can be found in are Nuts ’N More® and Krush Nutrition, so it is important that you always read labels. Of course, many brands you'd find in the supermarket aisle are perfectly fine.

If you really want to play it safe, making your own peanut butter from scratch is easier than you think. Just roast a pan of peanuts, stick them in the blender, and add with just a pinch of salt. Your taste buds and your dog  will thank you.

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You can even find a homemade peanut butter recipe, here! To read ASPCA’s findings on the effects of xylitol, click here.

Correction: When this article was published, we included a photo of a dog eating SKIPPY brand peanut butter out of a jar. We would never publish a photo of a dog ingesting anything that might hurt them, but many readers thought we were suggesting that SKIPPY contains xylitol and might be dangerous to dogs. We have removed that photo for the sake of clarity and would like to state that SKIPPY peanut butter does not contain xylitol or other ingredients harmful to dogs.

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